Archives pour la catégorie NUTRITION

EU donates additional € 1.5 million to UNICEF to combat child malnutrition in Chad

N´DJAMENA (Chad), 23rd October 2015 – The European Commission has allocated additional Euro 1.5 million in humanitarian aid funding to the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) to strengthen the response to child under-nutrition in three regions in western Chad (namely Lac, Kanem and Bar El Ghazal).

This is in response to the increase in the number of cases of children suffering from under-nutrition in these regions. The deterioration of the situation is caused by a poor rainfall during the rainy season weakening the harvest and the de facto closure of the border with Nigeria due to Boko Haram-linked violence. Both have been a heavy blow to the livelihoods in Western Chad.

“Given the impact of both the seasonal and conflict related issues, there is now a need for the humanitarian community to accelerate their response with emergency food and nutrition assistance,” stated Philippe Barragne-Bigot, UNICEF Representative in Chad. “The European Commission’s generous contribution, via its Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection department (ECHO), will once again ensure that Chadian children suffering from under-nutrition can be assisted.”

“Food insecurity in Western Chad has increased at an alarming rate. The violence alongside the border between Nigeria and Chad caused new population displacements with dire humanitarian consequences,” said Olivier Brouant, Head of the ECHO Office in Chad. “The additional funding will allow UNICEF to continue to tackle the nutrition challenges, by maintaining and improving the response of interventions in the three most affected regions in this area.”

A recent survey conducted by the World Food Programme (WFP) shows alarming food insecurity and under-nutrition in the Lake Region and in bordering Kanem and Barh El Gazel. The number of food insecure people in these three regions of western Chad has increased from 339,000 to 522,000 in six months. The number of admissions to the hospitals related to the under-nutrition have increased by 23% percent in the three regions compared to the same period last year. Routinely gathered data on admissions for treatment shows that between January and August 2015 more than 35,000 severely undernourished children were admitted for treatment in the three regions. The number being much higher than expected for the period, it puts a serious strain on the capacity of the health centers to respond adequately.

With this new funding UNICEF will cover 184 health facilities and provide the treatment for almost 24,000 SAM (Severely Acutely Malnourished) children. In close coordination with governmental and non-governmental organizations, UNICEF will support existing systems to improve the quality as well as increase the accessibility of basic services.

The funding comes on top of a contribution of €4 million provided earlier this year by ECHO and UK Aid from the UK Government. Thanks to the previous contribution, UNICEF ensures the treatment of the expected SAM cases among children under-five years of age in the Sahel Regions of Chad. In addition, UNICEF will continue to improve the supply chain of Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food, to provide essential drugs and to build up districts’ capacities in the treatment of SAM.

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About the European Commission – Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection department (ECHO)

The European Union and its Member States are the world’s leading donor of humanitarian aid. Relief assistance is an expression of European solidarity towards people in need around the world. It aims to save lives, prevent and alleviate human suffering, and safeguard the integrity and human dignity of populations affected by natural disasters and man-made crises.

The European Commission ensures rapid and effective delivery of EU relief assistance through its two main instruments: humanitarian aid and civil protection. The Commission, through its Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection department (ECHO), helps over 120 million victims of conflict and disasters every year. With headquarters in Brussels and a global network of field offices, ECHO provides assistance to the most vulnerable people solely on the basis of humanitarian needs.

For more information, please visit ECHO’s website.

The Commission has assisted Chad with humanitarian aid since 1994,in the aftermath of the Darfur refugee crisis. Over the past decade, the Commission has committed more than €341 million for humanitarian programmes in the country. Since 2014, it has made available more than €89.5million for multi-sectorial assistance to people affected by the crises.

About UNICEF
UNICEF works in 190 countries and territories to help children survive and thrive, from early childhood through adolescence. The world’s largest provider of vaccines for developing countries, UNICEF supports child health and nutrition, good water and sanitation, quality basic education for all boys and girls, and the protection of children from violence, exploitation, and AIDS. UNICEF is funded entirely by the voluntary contributions of individuals, businesses, foundations and governments. For more information about UNICEF and its work visit: www.unicef.org

To find out more about the EU-UNICEF partnership, visit http://www.unicef.org/eu/

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Passionate and hardworking Chadian health workers like Nutrition Counsellor Darasalam are at the frontline of saving children’s lives. Watch her story and download multimedia contents here: http://weshare.unicef.org/C.aspx?VP3=ViewBox&DNID=2AM40GXXQPXW&DM=Distribution

For further information, please contact:

Mathias Eick Global Information Officer, DG ECHO (European Commission) Nairobi, + 254-717968426, Mathias.Eick@echofield.eu , http://ec.europa.eu/echo/

Lalaina Fatratra Andriamasinoro I Chief of Communication I UNICEF Chad
+235 66 36 00 42 I lfandriamasinoro@unicef.org I www.unicef.org/chad

Publicités

« Un pays ne peut pas se développer sans sécurité nutritionnelle »

Interview de Monsieur Cheikh MH Dehah
Le professeur Cheikh Dehah, consultant international et enseignant à l’Université de Nouakchott en Mauritanie a fait le déplacement au Tchad à l’occasion du Forum National sur la Nutrition.
Pr Cheikh Dehah, consultant international et enseignant à l’Université de Nouakchott en Mauritanie. ©UNICEF Chad/2015/Nour
Pr Cheikh Dehah, est enseignant à l’Université de Nouakchott en Mauritanie.
©UNICEF Chad/2015/Nour

Pourquoi la nutrition est-elle si importante pour le développement d’un pays ?

Je pense qu’il y a un travail de plaidoyer et de communication à faire pour expliquer aux décideurs que la sécurité alimentaire est le socle, la base de tout développement. Un pays ne peut pas être souverain sans sécurité alimentaire mais un pays ne peut pas se développer sans sécurité nutritionnelle. Il faut que les deux soient ensemble pour atteindre la résilience qui est le résultat du développement. La résilience c’est la durée.

« Investir dans la nutrition peut augmenter le PIB d’un pays de 8 à 11% »

C’est lors des évènements du Niger, je voudrais parler ici de la sécheresse et de la famine qui a sévit au Niger en 2005-2006, que la communauté internationale s’est rendue compte que tous les pays du Sahel sont concernés car on y rencontre les mêmes conditions climatiques et socio-économiques. Malgré les efforts du gouvernement, cette malnutrition persiste et même augmente et a un impact sur l’augmentation de la mortalité maternelle et infantile.

Des études démontrent qu’investir dans la nutrition n’est pas une perte d’argent, au contraire, en investissant 1 dollar dans la nutrition, les gouvernements peuvent gagner 30 dollars. Investir dans la nutrition peut augmenter le PIB d’un pays de 8 à 11%.

Lire la suite « Un pays ne peut pas se développer sans sécurité nutritionnelle »

Alarming Rise of Malnutrition and Food Insecurity in Western Chad

Par Badre Bahaji

Mao – Bagasola – May 12th, 2015 – It is market day in the little town of Bagasola, alongside Lake Chad. Since early morning, under the shade of wooden and reed shacks, merchants, artisans and local traders are rushing around in what used to be a hub trade in the region.

Zara Gayi is eight-months pregnant, she is only twenty-five and has four children.She is selling mangos, tomatoes and vegetables in the market of Bagasola, and can make 600 Nairas profit on a good day (2.50€). “My husband used to ride boats to Nigeria. Since the border closure months ago, he cannot work anymore. In the past, he could earn one hundred thousand Nairas a month (450€). Now he is at home, feeling powerless and depressed” she said. Since January 2015, an estimated 18,000 Nigerian refugees and 8,500 Chadian returnees fled violence linked to Boko Haram in Northeastern Nigeria into Chad.

In Bagasola, this influx of population is an additional burden. The Lake Region depends on commerce with Nigeria, farming and fishing on the lake for subsistence. With the border closed and insecurity in Nigeria, markets for cattle and farming products are shut down.

Zara Gayi is selling fruits and vegetables in the market of Bagasola, “My husband was riding boats to Nigeria. Since the border closure months ago, there is no work. My children are suffering; we used to have three meals a day, now we can barely afford one. UNICEF Chad/2015/Bahaji
Zara Gayi is selling fruits and vegetables in the market of Bagasola, “My husband was riding boats to Nigeria. Since the border closure months ago, there is no work. My children are suffering; we used to have three meals a day, now we can barely afford one. » UNICEF Chad/2015/Bahaji

Mr Dimouya Soua Pebe is the Deputy Head of District of Bagasola: “Local food reserves will run out well before the next harvest. Refugees also have right to access water, health centers and send their children to school. Unfortunately, we cannot cover all these needs alone, partners such as UNICEF are supporting us but we are calling for more efforts to prevent more human suffering.”

Khadidja Adoum is 24, her face and silhouette witness the hardship she is facing. Poor rainfalls, bad harvest and a chronic food insecurity are the daily realities of the communities of her village, Loumba Arameda in the Kanem Region. Married when she was fifteen, she is hardly raising her four children: “We have no source of income and we don’t own any cattle or land.My husband only has an old cart, he is carrying bricks or any other goods when trucks are passing by the market and makes little money.After the rainy season, we farm along the wadis (Arabic term for a valley of a stream usually dry except during the rainy season) but last year we harvest only one hundred kilo of millet covering only three months of our needs. At the moment, we cannot afford to buy much in the market, cereals are too expensive” she said.

A recent survey conducted by WFP highlighted alarming food insecurity in Kanem, Lake and Barh El Gazal Regions. The number of food insecure people have increased from 339,000 to 552,000 in six months. With the border closed and insecurity in Nigeria, markets for cattle and agriculture products are shut down. The survey has also shown increased prices and high levels of household debt due to poor rainfalls and bad harvest in 2014.

My child eats only once a day. It is not enough.” Khadidja Adoum lives in the Kanem Region and her daughter was admitted in Mondo health center for the fourth time this year because of malnutrition. UNICEF/Chad/2015/Bahaji
« My child eats only once a day. It is not enough” Khadidja Adoum lives in the Kanem Region and her daughter was admitted in Mondo health center for the fourth time this year because of malnutrition. UNICEF/Chad/2015/Bahaji

Two of Khadidja’s children were admitted to the in-patient facility of the Mondo health center for the fourth time this year. They suffer from severe acute malnutrition with medical complications. “I am trying to feed them once a day, but it is not enough. A few years ago, I lost two children, one has died in my arms on the way to the health center. I have to walk two hours to come here, when I arrived, it was too late“ she said, bitter.

90% of the 2015 annual prevision for malnutrition admissions in the Kanem region has already been reached in the first quarter of the year putting a serious strain on the capacity of the health centres to adequately respond. Dr Sylvestre Bebang, the District Medical Officer is worried about the situation in his district: “We conducted an assessment in November 2014 and estimated that monthly two hundred and twenty nine children would need treatment for malnutrition in my district. Yet, in April 2015, we screened more than one thousand children. Unfortunately, we could only treat the most severely affected and mothers are desperate. If we don’t improve our response we can expect the worst for the lean season. »

Update: November 2015:

The European Commission — Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection Department has allocated additional funding (1.5 million Euro) to UNICEF to strengthen the response to child under-nutrition in three regions of Western Chad. With this new funding UNICEF covers 184 health facilities and provide the treatment for almost 24,000 Severely Acutely Malnourished children

With ECHO’s support, UNICEF Chad targets to treat 150 000 children suffering from malnutrition in 2015. Thanks to this contribution, UNICEF will continue to improve the supply chain of Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food, to provide essential drugs and to build up districts’ capacities in the treatment of malnutrition.